My Whizbang
Squash Planting Secret

Dateline: 12 March 2008
Updated: 2 May 2013


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This young squash plant is getting off to a great start in life.

After posting My Whizbang Squash Planting Secret here five years ago, almost 9,000 people have read it and learned about growing squash with Whizbang BOF holes and sidewall cloches. 

I have now moved the essay to the online Resources web site of The Planet Whizbang Idea Book For Gardeners

When you purchase a copy of the book, you are given the "key" to finding the book's hidden online Resources web site. 

Best Whizbang wishes,

Herrick Kimball

P.S. Check out the reader comments below.......

14 comments:

Ron and Ginny said...

That is a super nifty idea! Thanks for revealing the secret (until now) method for planting squash. The hole idea is pretty nifty, too! :-D

Marci said...

Great ideas, Herrick. Thanks for sharing!!

Tabletop Homestead said...

Herrick

Do ya'll have any trouble with squash bugs? Not the borers, the bugs, the stinky ones. They're my major garden nemesis.

Love the sidewall cloches. I think I'll sweet talk my honey into making me some.:)

Judy

T Rice said...

Like tabletop I was hoping for a solution for dealing with squash bugs; the vine borers, not the stinky ones. Anybody got any ideas?

They are really bad down here in the tropical southlands.

Tom

Tammy said...

Wonderful!! We eat a TON of butternut all year long and I'm doing everything I can in my side yard garden to grow as many as possible. This year that will include growing some of them vertical. I would imagine you could do the sidewall cloch modified as a tunnel... but the hard part is going to be digging that many Whizbang BOF Holes since I can plant closer together. Either way, I loved the essay and thanks so much for the tips!

The Unusually Unusual Farmchick said...

Love it! i have clay soil within 6 inches deep. My husband has a vacation the last week in April and promised to help get the garden ready...I guess he will have to add digging some BOF holes. What is your opio on using the method for tomatoes? eggplants? oh dang! He has around 100 holes to dig now...
Thanks for a great Tutorial and sharing the BOF secret.

EcoMaMa said...

For your vine borers plant mint nearby, but semi contained. It will take over if you are not careful.

Anonymous said...

Love the idea!! I have had problems with the Squash bugs too. Last year I planted Nasturtium with my squash and it worked like a charm. I used the vining variety not the bush.

Anonymous said...

Another easy way to grow squash- I have horses. On a fairly composted pile of manure, I scrape down about 6 inches toi remove weeds and plant the squash on top of the manure pile. With virtually zero work I harvested 30-40 squash last year.

Shadows of the goddess designs said...

awesome !!!!!!!!! I have to try this . I am going to be stopping by your blog alot i can tell :P

Bippy said...

For those having problems with bugs- I've been reading some interesting research on salicylic acid as a plant's natural bug-defense system. For us plain folks, that's called asprin, which was derived from willow bark.

A bunch of people have been having amazing luck using about a half tablet of asprin in a gallon of water as a treatment for plants that are having problems of any sort, or seeds that are picky about germinating. It seems to be the plant version of an immune system booster shot, and makes it easier for them to fight off bugs, mold, and other icky bad nasties.

It's easy and cheap to try, fairly organic, and can't hurt, so why not give it a shot?

egp said...

waw great idea, do you know Agribon can provide up to 8º +F of freeze and frost protection

Inalienable Rights said...

My main problem with squash is vine borers. Has anyone used row cover to defeat these devils?

Honey said...

Garden vertically. Train your vine up over some pretty arches using rebar or field fencing. I do this with melons (even watermelon), squash, tomatoes, beans, peas...you name it. By taking stuff up and over it gives me more space for other veggies that are low and shade lovers. Oh...my cucs LOVE this too as they just meander along and are straight and lovely. Keeps the bugs outta the veggies.

Also, plant nasturiums everywhere. Icicle radishes especially are a great trap crop for bugs when it comes to the squash and melons.

~Honey